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WTR

Training Needs Analysis (TNA)

29 January 2019

Training Needs Analysis (TNA)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Training needs analysis (TNA) is a process conducted to identify how – or whether – training can resolve a workplace problem or improve workplace performance.

The purpose of conducting a training needs analysis is to fully understand the training, learning, and educational needs of an organisation and its staff. A TNA can help an organisation to design and implement learning and development programs that are aligned to the strategic goals of the organisation. It can assist an organisation to build the people capability it needs for long term success

Once you know ‘what’ an employee needs to do, you can analyse the skills and knowledge that they need in order to be effective. First, you will need to know the following:

  • How the employee contributes to the overall operations of their team and the organisation
  • The policies and procedures they must comply with
  • Legislative requirements and/or codes of practice
  • Reporting and lines of authority
  • The employee’s rights and responsibilities

The next step is to analyse and document the skills and knowledge of the individuals or target group.

Documentation that will assist includes:

  • Records of work history within the organisation and previously
  • Records of current qualifications, certificates, statements of attainment and licences
  • Documented performance reviews

It is also essential at this point to interview members of the target group (preferably each individual). You need their own personal evaluation of their knowledge and skills together with information about their desires and motivation.

Once you have collated and analysed both sides of the TNA, this will identify any gaps. It is important at this stage to determine whether the gaps are significant and warrant training or not.

You may be conducting the TNA in response to an organisational or team performance problem. The problem may not be resolved by training. In such a case, management would need to become involved in order to determine the cause of the performance problem.

If the TNA indicates that training is required, the next step is to find the right type of training. This may mean working with a training organisation that can tailor-make a solution to fit your needs.